Roundtables and Case Studies

Day 1

Roundtable sessions

13:55 – 14:55 IN BISHOPGATE

Matt Austin, Managing Consultant & Coach, Matt Cheung, CEO and Emily Jenkins, Clarasys
How to Build a Minimum Viable Business – One Slice at a Time

Iwona Winiarska, Agile Delivery Manager, Government Digital Service
10 Tips for Agile Delivery Managers

Stefan Erschwendner, Managing Partner and Olivia Köhler, Strategy Consultant, LHBS
Get Agile with LEGO

Rebecca Ulyatt, Partnership Director, Blue Sky Performance Improvement
People Power

Pam Ashby, Communications Specialist
Exploring Agile Marketing

Haydn Shaughnessy, Chief Content & Design Officer Flow Academy Company and Fin Goulding, International CIO, Aviva
The Customer in the Agile Business

For more information on roundtable sessions, download the event app.

Day 2

Roundtable sessions

11:10 – 12:00 IN BROADGATE 1

Dot Tudor, Technical Director, TCC
Vision, Product, Focus, Canvas – an Experiential introduction for Product Owners

Adam Alker, Manager IT, mBANK S.A.
What is the foundation of Agile transformation?

Tamsin Anastasi-Pace, Senior Vice President, Global Head of Operational Change, The Economist Group
The Art of Asking

Liz Barron, ICF Associate Certified Coach & Owner, Realize Coaching & Consulting
Empowering Generation Agile through Coaching Skills

Katie Taylor, Director, Agile Business Consortium
Agile culture awareness cards

Jon Sleeper, Executive Coach and Agile Practitioner
Agile Coaches Competency Compass

Catherine Harrisson, Principal, North Highland and Joel Robinson, Head of Strategy & Planning, Digital & Technology, Sainsbury’s
Agile investments: prioritising work by value

Máté Palicz, Business Development Lead, StatusApp
Build effective Agile teams with regular feedback

Aga Gajownik, Founder of Innovation & Integration Ltd, Hackathon Designer & Public Speaker
Understanding Generation Z


13:55 – 14:55 IN BISHOPGATE

Symon Cusack, Agile Technical Director, Atkins
Generation Agile survival guide

Steve Morlidge, Director, Satori Partners
Agile projects without budgets

Mark Newman, CEO & Founder, The Morphix Company
Transforming big business: what place has software been creating an empowered and collaborative business?

Leila Rao, Enterprise Lean Agile Consultant, AgileXtended
A compass for (business) agility

Kathy Berkidge, Agile Trainer & Coach/Mindfulness Teacher, Mind at Work Consulting
The Agile mindset: the heart of an Agile culture

For more information on roundtable sessions, download the event app.

Case Studies

13:55 – 14:55 IN BROADGATE 1

Amanda Colpoys, Head Agile Coach, Moonpig
An overview of Moonpig’s agile journey, beginning with improved delivery in product engineering, through to the extension of lean and agile working across the wider organisation.

David Kershaw, Freelance Agile Procurement for the UK Government
Having been part of various multidisciplinary teams David has developed an understanding of and has practiced various Agile related skills and methods. He has always focused on delivery. Unfortunately, public procurement is overshadowed by both legislation and its own risk appetite.
In 2016 David was approached by officials from No.10 to use his Agile delivery experience to transform the commercial frameworks used within the marketing, advertising and PR space. Prior to him starting the programme was at risk and delivery was extremely slow.
The team were not tech or digital and had never heard of agile. David did basic agile things, but they worked.
David would love to tell the Agile world about this and others areas he has applied Agile and to thank them for letting procurement in (he is only one of a few MCIPS procurement people pushing Agile).

Nick Brown, Agile Lead at PwC
In a world which is becoming increasingly data-driven, it is still surprising how few teams use data.
39% of executives say their companies are already highly data-driven, yet mention data to many practitioners having conversations with the same executives and they shudder at the thought.
Why is this? Is it the toxic nature that ‘metrics’ have become synonymous with or is it because we view using data as a dangerous flirtation with placing more value in tools and processes?
This session will challenge the taboo that data has in our industry. Through case study examples of using a data-based coaching approach with our teams at PwC I will aim to debunk the myths around metrics and highlight how effective data-based coaching still has its foundations in agile, whether it be through Scrum’s ‘three pillars of empiricism’ or Kanban’s ‘scientific method’.


13:55 – 14:55 IN BROADGATE 2

Joel Robinson, Head of Strategy & Planning, Digital & Technology for Sainsburys and Catherine Harrisson, Principal, North Highland
Digital & Technology (D&T) within Sainsburys was facing challenges with the speed and value of its delivery and needed to evolve to offer its people a better experience and be a true partner to the business. 18 months ago, a new organisation structure designed around product families was introduced and since then a small collaborative team of Sainsbury’s and North Highland colleagues have been working on developing a sustainable transformation in ways of working across D&T at Sainsbury’s.
During our presentation we will cover:
• How to build stable, integrated teams
• Agile ways of working: how you change behaviours, principles and processes
• The implications of pushing decision-making to the lowest point in the organisation
• Prioritising by value and measuring value delivered
• Transforming the investment process

Jeremy Renwick, CxO, Agilesphere
Conway’s Law and Larman’s laws of Organizational Behavior are examples of “structure drives behaviour”; a core concept in systems thinking. The current siloed, hierarchical organisation structure are not only inflexible, they drive people to focus on delighting senior executives rather than customers, citizens or fellow employees.
The imperative to move to a organisational structure that can genuinely adapt is now acute. Existing organisations are being challenged by new business models. New entrants are struggling to scale while keeping their uniqueness and market focus. At the same time, both are being held back by outdated mental models. The stresses and strains caused by these challenges have a very human cost in health and well-being.
Agile seems to provide many of the answers, however, all Digital and Agile transformations run into problems when the new ways of working challenge existing organisation structures; they are incompatible with each other.
What’s needed is a generic adaptive organisational structure to replace the siloed hierarchy. One that genuinely enables and empowers people.
In this session Jeremy will outline the Adaptive Organisation structure to replace the traditional hierarchy and the insights and lessons from implementing it in Agilesphere.

Giles Lindsay, Director of Software Engineering, dnata
The session revolves not only around an introduction to the Disciplined Agile Framework but also around the Agile Transformation of a Fintech company in the heart of the City, using Disciplined Agile and the achievements of that business over a 12-18 months period.
On arriving at the company, I discovered during the first 6 months of 2016, they had delivered 3 programmes of work (of varying size) using a waterfall or JFDI approach to development, with no understanding of capacity, time or cost.
Having spent the next 3 months with all the teams globally, introducing the Disciplined Agile Framework, the development governance, the portfolio management and project management office and the right tools to support it all, the company smashed the delivery KPI set in September 2016.
It delivered over 100 programmes of work in under 12 months, being able to understand the cost of each, the cost of delay and the return of investment.
The next chapter and challenge now begins, performing the same Agile Transformation at scale, across the global dnata family.

Case Studies

13:55 – 14:55 IN BROADGATE 2

Leonor Barroca, Senior Lecturer, The Open University
A district council in the South East has undergone a transformation process that began with breaking out of the old council mould and becoming commercially self-sufficient, thus counteracting reduced funding, whilst building value, meeting customer needs for the future, serving the community, protecting key services and building financial strength. This has been a catalyst for internal cultural transformation. This transformation emerged top-down to create a business focussed workforce with the ability to adapt easily to change. It focussed on assessing five core commercial behaviours in employees: customer focus & insight, delivering results, maximising personal potential, building effective relationships, innovating and adapting to change.
This case-study contrasts perspectives from key stakeholders at the council and researchers from the Agile Research Network who carried out interviews, observations and an organisational culture assessment with board members and managers. Achievements, challenges, lessons learned and steps ahead will be presented.

Philippe Guenet, Founder & Principal Consultant, Henko
“Next year, we’ll all be 80% agile”, promised the CIO. For which outcomes? Reducing costs? Becoming digitally competitive? What does 80% agile means anyway? Many digital transformations and agile adoption programmes start on this wrong foot. This leads to huge efforts and expenses for very little tangible returns in terms of business outcomes. Eventually the development teams are doing Scrum, but the delivery is still challenged, waste is high, and innovation is not getting any faster. What have those efforts missed? The overwhelming answer is people & leadership! IT is knowledge work and knowledge workers need to be managed in a very different fashion. In this talk, Philippe will explore developing the 3 levels of Digital Intelligence with teams & leadership and give practical examples of how to move from resistance to active facilitation of digital performance.

Andy Barton, Assistant Director, Aylesbury Vale District Council
A district council in the South East has undergone a transformation process that began with breaking out of the old council mould and becoming commercially self-sufficient, thus counteracting reduced funding, whilst building value, meeting customer needs for the future, serving the community, protecting key services and building financial strength. This has been a catalyst for internal cultural transformation. This transformation emerged top-down to create a business focussed workforce with the ability to adapt easily to change. It focussed on assessing five core commercial behaviours in employees: customer focus & insight, delivering results, maximising personal potential, building effective relationships, innovating and adapting to change.
This case-study contrasts perspectives from key stakeholders at the council and researchers from the Agile Research Network who carried out interviews, observations and an organisational culture assessment with board members and managers. Achievements, challenges, lessons learned and steps ahead will be presented.